It’s no secret that the global tech sector is advancing at an astonishingly rapid pace – not least in relation to the now integral role of digital transformation in spearheading growth and success. But no matter the size or scope or your organisation – or how sophisticated your innovation strategy is – the only way to drive significant change is to leverage the power of people.

So, to champion some of the industry’s finest talent, and gain some insight into the minds of individuals from across the tech space, we’re inviting friends and partners of the business to take part in our quickfire Q&A.

Up next, it’s Gary Saunders, managing director at CloudCoCo…

Tell us about your role at CloudCoCo and the part you play in the tech sector.

I have such a vast range of responsibilities, but some key elements of my role include overseeing the sales function, as well as CloudCoCo website enhancements, and developing our managed service function.

We’re a people-led business with a skilled team of experts who help customers gain a competitive edge. We supply modern, innovative IT solutions that underpin and support crucial business activities, whilst putting power back into the hands of customers.

What innovation was the turning point for your organisation, to get it to where you are now?

Throughout the course of our journey, we’ve had a number of key acquisitions that have taken us from the two-person company CloudCoCo was in 2018, to an industry leading organisation with a strong team of technical and customer-focused specialists.

And where’s next for your business?

There is still work to be done to enable the Group to reach its full potential, and the macro-economic environment remains unpredictable. But with the hard work that has taken place to lay the foundations for sustainable and profitable growth in the future, we are confident of continued progress in the second half and moving into FY23.

The biggest misconception faced by the tech sector is…

At the moment, it’s the fact everyone believes everything is about cloud.

While cloud has a major place in every successful tech strategy, people think it’s the only option. In reality, hybridity is the epitome of innovation, combining the benefits of traditional services, managed IT, and the cloud – rather than solely focusing on one element.

What do you think will be the biggest tech trend over the next 12 months?

People maximising the infrastructure and licencing they already have – and if this isn’t a key trend, it should be.

Microsoft is constantly evolving and as such, there are limitations on certain licencing which can have a real impact on business. Instead, it’s about maximising use and really hammering home the education piece.

Plus, in a time where cash is king for many, people are reluctant to spend money – if organisations make the most of what they already have and rinse their existing tools of their true worth, they’ll be in good stead.

What top tip would you give to an individual trying to excel in their tech career?

Be a sponge, soak up knowledge, and keep an open mind. There are so many people to learn from in this industry – don’t take the opportunity to seek advice for granted.

The next purchase on my personal tech wish list is…?

I’d love an electric car, but I’d say my personal goals are naturally driven by the business.

And what is your earliest memory of tech in your life?

Mobile phones – specifically, a flip-up Motorola StarTAC with a huge aerial. I worked with this kind of tech a lot in my early career.

What is one longstanding piece of tech you are shocked is still used today?

I’m amazed that people still use tape drives rather than having cloud backup. They’re so easy to damage or misplace, so there’s a significant risk of data loss.

For me it’s a no-brainer to leave tape drives in the past, but I think sometimes people are too reluctant to break old habits – even if it comes with such high stakes!

If you are without the internet for an hour, what would be the first activity you resort to, to pass the time?

I’d listen to talkSPORT on the radio and catch up with the latest – whether it’s football, cricket, rugby, or anything really.

I’ve always been a sporty person, and it’s such easy listening.

It’s our newest recruit, Holly’s turn in the spotlight this month. Here, she delves deeper into her career trajectory to date, passion for gaming, and hopes for the future of the tech industry.

How did you first get into the world of tech?

I had been looking for a career change from hospitality after completing a master’s degree in business management and marketing. I knew I wanted to work in the technology sector, as I find the culture to be extremely collaborative and empowering – a world away from the stuffy traditions and hierarchy that I was used to.

I contacted a sales recruitment company that supports eager post-graduates to find the perfect placement, and they put me forward for a whole host of opportunities – including Vapour. As soon as I got talking to Tim and Carol, I knew Vapour was the organisation I wanted to work for!

And what is your earliest memory of tech in your life?

I grew up around Windows 95 and 97, playing old MS-DOS floppy disks on a PC weighing almost as much as me! My Dad taught me a lot about how to get into the nitty gritty of these machines, and as soon as broadband took off when I was around 10 years old, I was hooked.

Now, when my parents have issues with their own laptops, they pass them to me in the hope I can get them up and running again. I should start charging them for the service really!

I’m also quite an avid gamer – indulging sometimes for whole weekends at a time.

What’s the one quality you need to thrive in this environment (especially at Vapour)?

I love building relationships, and believe that you work for people – not for organisations. I’m very grateful for the opportunity to meet such a great team of individuals, each an expert at what they do.

This position really is perfect for me. The combination of ongoing learning opportunities, coupled with the ability to chat to and meet inspiring people every day, is what makes me feel so fulfilled.

And what is the one thing you would change about the tech sector?

There are already great changes in the fabric of the tech workforce – with national and local organisations like ‘girls who code’ and ‘Northcoders’ getting females interested in IT and helping women to break into the tech sector.

A bigger variety of tech modules should be taught in both primary and secondary education, with areas such as coding being a separate subject and available at an earlier age. It is so integral to the way we live now, that education in the UK really needs to get a move on and catch up!

Why do you think Vapour stands out in the channel?

Vapour has the expertise to deliver what we do to the highest standard, always giving the best advice to clients and developing honest and sustainable relationships. We are innovative with the tools that we have, continuously finding solutions to meet such a wide variety of needs.

The way in which the team works together is also recognised by our clients, with our culture embedded throughout customer journeys as well as our own operations.

Complete the sentences:

The best piece of tech ever invented is...

entertainment on demand. It has completely disrupted and redesigned the way we consume media – giving power back to the consumer, providing such a rich variety of content, and allowing alternative creators to make a living from doing something they love.

The next purchase on my (personal) tech wishlist is...

a top-of-the-line gaming PC!

A tech firm that has really stood out for me in the last 12 months is...

I have to agree with my colleague Sam on this one, and say Tesla.

The stirring disruption to an industry, that was so unsustainable just a few years ago, has been exciting to watch. Musk’s unabashed promotion of freedom of information will no doubt continue to ruffle feathers.

The biggest misconception in the channel is that...

tech solutions are always complicated and can only be understood by a select few.

By the end of 2022, our tech will have made organisations far more...

connected, collaborative, and resilient. As seen over the last couple of years in particular, flexibility and future-proofing need to remain at the top of every business agenda to stay ahead of the curve.

Our head of transformation and operations, Carol McGrotty, makes up part of the 19% of women who work in the tech sector.

This month, she shared her thoughts with TechBlast on what it means to have a career in a typically male-dominated industry, insights into her own experiences throughout her 20-year tenure, and why females mustn’t underestimate their worth.

If you didn’t catch the write-up, now’s your chance…

‘I’m great at my job – and I’m not ashamed to admit it’

Carol McGrotty makes up part of the 19% of women who work in the tech sector, and says females mustn’t underestimate their worth.

I’m great at what I do – and I can confidently write that down.

I’m not boastful or arrogant, but I didn’t want to say, ‘my name is Carol and I have imposter syndrome’.

Estimates vary, but it’s thought that women account for between 19-26 per cent of the tech sector. Straight away, it means we’re a minority group – so it’s really important we don’t fall into the trap of underestimating our values and skills.

By way of background, I’m in charge of digital transformation and operations at a Yorkshire-based tech firm called Vapour Cloud.

I have a rich portfolio of experience which is continually expanding, a comprehensive network of industry connections, plus I’m incredibly tenacious and passionate. The fact Vapour sought me out directly to join the business in 2013 is testament to my expertise.

Yet, imposter syndrome has long been a struggle I’ve had to manage – and that’s something I see time and again in other successful women, particularly when speaking in public.

In such a male-dominated industry, it can be difficult not to buy into the messages circulated by others, and the need to constantly remind myself of the value I’m bringing to the table becomes tiring at the best of times.

In my case, I joined the tech sector in 2000, swapping my career in insurance to help deliver projects to enterprise and public sector customers, whilst also contributing to process improvement workstreams and breakthrough product launches.

With a strong network of female leaders around me from the outset, my own drive and curiosity quickly translated into a desire to follow in the footsteps of my own mentors and empower a similar culture of inclusivity as my trajectory developed.

But while I’ve undoubtedly had an easier ride than most as a woman in the tech realm, many doubts have still managed to cast a shadow on my success.

Luckily, I can’t recall any direct examples of misogyny, but walking into a professional event as the only woman in the room naturally induces immense pressures to prove my worth – without coming across as ‘too much’, ‘challenging’, or being seen as a ‘diversity hire’.

For a movement that was created to address the lack of female representation throughout the industry, I fear that ‘women in tech’ can actually sometimes play into many of the shallow debates and preconceived ideas about gender.

But in the split-second of struggle, I remind myself just how necessary it is the bang the drum for all forms of equality and diversity in our space.

By nature, interacting with a more diverse team forces individuals to consider viewpoints beyond their own – and often, women maintain a ‘softer’ skillset that affords a crucial element of control and rationality.

The trouble is, such excellence is seen as so much of a pre-requisite for women, that it is undervalued, whereas it can feel that men are often considered to be exceptional in their role if they master the art of communication, for example.

In such a fast-paced industry, built on the need for constant innovation, women’s innate ability to ‘put the brakes on’ and look at the wider picture – accounting for everything from feasibility and longevity, to external viewpoints and impacts on ESG factors – is key. Your tech strategy shouldn’t just be based on ROI, after all.

It goes without saying that mentorship from female leads will continue to play a significant role in closing the gender gap, but more importantly, it’s about facilitating a career path with ample progression opportunities – with education on what this might look like being the starting point to incite and inspire change.

In a generation so involved in tech, such a limited number understand what a career in the industry actually means – with visions of laptops and IT hacks dominating the perspectives of our younger generations.

Allowing college students to spend time with engineers and experience different departments to expand prospects and ignite passions they might not have previously had continues to be a major driver in broadening horizons.

Careers in beauty and cosmetics, nursing and midwifery, and teaching, are all options – just as they are for young male students. And only by facilitating these ideas can we achieve the dream of complete gender parity in any and all industries.

Organisations need to take a leaf out of Girlguiding UK’s book. In a bid to involve more girls in technology – after research found more than half (52%) of girls and women between the ages of 11 and 21 believed that STEM was for boys – a whole host of new activities have been introduced to the curriculum. New additions will see Rainbows embark on an app-related course, Brownies learn coding, and Guides delve deeper into the world of chatbots.

With such initiatives, we can break gender biases from an early age and empower girls – and boys – to think about their interests, and eventually career prospects, with a more open mind.

It is Sam’s turn in the spotlight this month, as he tells us about breaking into the tech industry, his love of gaming, and why Tesla’s innovations have been a real stand-out over the last 12 months…

How did you first get into the world of tech?

It’s always been more of a passion than anything. I loved gaming and anything sci-fi related from a young age, and as I grew older, I found a keen interest in building PC’s too.

So, when it came to planning out my career prospects, it seemed like the obvious choice to look at avenues in tech – not least because it’s such a fast-growing industry. I saw Vapour doing great things, and wanted to get my foot in the door.

And what is your earliest memory of tech in your life?

The Atari Joystick was my bread and butter for years. Pacman, Dig Dug – I used to play them all!

What’s the one quality you need to thrive in this environment (especially at Vapour)?

I’d say willingness to learn and try new things.

Both the tech industry and Vapour as a business are constantly evolving, and innovation never stands still – even the experts don’t know what’s on the horizon at times. That’s why it’s crucial to be open-minded to change and exploration.

And what is the one thing you would change about the tech sector?

The jargon. Technical language needs to be simpler across the board.

As much as tech is integrated into the world, there’s a lot of people who don’t know where to start – including employees. When I joined Vapour, I sought the role out directly because the team is so straight-talking and has a proven track record. Others might not be so lucky in getting that entry-level foot in the door.

Why do you think Vapour stands out in the channel?

First-class products are a given with Vapour, and the results they achieve are testament to their success.

But something that really stands out for me, above all else, is the level of customer service we offer. You can rely on the team 24/7, and customers are constantly firing positive feedback our way.

Complete the sentences:

The best piece of tech ever invented is...

The Gameboy. It was so ahead of its time in terms of portable gaming, and I spent hours on end during car trips as a child on it.  

The next purchase on my (personal) tech wish list is...

A sturdier pair of headphones – mine always seem to be breaking!

A tech firm that has really stood out for me in the last 12 months is...

I’d have to say Tesla. Having studied environmental sciences at university, electric cars are something that really pique my interest. From supercharging stations to the energy storage Megapacks, they’re always doing something to disrupt the industry!

 

It is Jordan’s turn in the spotlight this month, as he tells us about his days of playing FIFA 2004 on a PlayStation 1, his hope to see flying Tesla cars, and how he thinks the best piece of tech invented is the smart phone. 

How did you first get into the world of tech?

I initially wanted to be an electrician. Whilst I was doing my electrical courses in 2012, I was pleasantly introduced to my colleges 3x 48u racks full of cables, switches, and routers. Ever since I set my eyes on this, I was fixated. I asked my electrical tutor more questions about the rack than I did about 3 phase induction motors. 

And what is your earliest memory of tech in your life?

My earliest memory has got to be playing FIFA 2004 on the PlayStation 1. I was bad at this game and probably experienced too many angry moments by not being able to score goals on easy mode. 

As well as this, the first time I can remember being exposed to tech was having my first mobile phone – a Nokia 65000 – and downloading the soundtrack to ‘War of the Worlds’ from a well-known free website called ‘LimeWire’. I had to transfer it onto one phone and then Bluetooth it over to my own phone – this took 3 hours!

What’s the one quality you need to thrive in this environment (especially at Vapour)?

I wouldn’t pinpoint one skill specifically. To thrive I think people need to have multiple skills. For example, Vapour is full of individuals with a broad range of skillsets, and this is where I feel I fit in well. 

I would say being diverse would make people thrive in any environment, especially at Vapour where technology is at its forefront. 

And what is the one thing you would change about the tech sector?

I wouldn’t change anything. I think the direction we’re heading in should help develop the world and help us understand what we need to do in the future. 

Although, I would like to see flying Tesla’s in a few years so if Elon can hurry up with that before I’m to old to drive and need a bus pass.

Why do you think Vapour stands out in the channel?

I think Vapour can service and manage any business model, with its vast range of technology offerings. There aren’t many companies out there that can offer this many and be good at it. 

Vapour offers numerous products that are great and still provides excellent service to the market. 

Complete the sentences:

The best piece of tech ever invented is... a Smart Phone

The next purchase on my (personal) tech wish list is... an 8k TV 65”, keychron k2 keyboardA tech firm that has really stood out for me in the last 12 months is... Amazon

Vapour’s head of transformation and operations, Carol McGrotty, recently took part in a Q&A session for a feature on women in tech, with PCR magazine. If you missed it, you can read the article in full here...

1. Please could you provide name, job title, company

Carol McGrotty, Head of Transformation & Operations, Vapour

2. What is your professional background and how has this contributed to your current working position?

I joined the tech sector at the start of 2000, following a seven-year period working in insurance.  Initially, this was in a provisioning role delivering projects to enterprise and public sector customers, whilst also contributing to process improvement workstreams and new-to-market product launches. 

Having curiosity, a drive for purposeful transformation and a collaborative approach within the industry are still fundamentals in my position at Vapour today, as much as they were back when I began my tech journey.

3. What are your experiences of being a female tech leader?

For me it has always been a very positive experience, and I often refer to the fact that I am lucky in this regard – on reflection I wonder why this is, as surely it should be the norm for all females in this industry. When I started out in tech I had some very strong, knowledgeable and inspiring female leaders around me – who also then became my mentors.  Having had this grounding from the start of my career in tech has made me feel extremely passionate about being the same to other upcoming females.

4. What challenge have you encountered, if any, being a female in the tech sector?

Not so much of a challenge, but as I attend events, meetings and focus groups, I can often be the only female in the room.  At first, I could have seen this as a challenge – coupled with making it clear that you aren’t in attendance simply to take the minutes! But this is where relationship building comes to the fore, as does knowing your topic well, showing passion, listening to other peoples’ view points, and not trying to be someone else. As a female in tech if you’ve earned your right for a seat at the table, then you absolutely should be there.

5. What are your interests and passions in regards to working in the tech channel?

A key part of my role at Vapour is promoting our culture, leading by example on our company values and behaviours, and encouraging and supporting our teams in doing the same – through initiatives, committees, focus groups and sponsors. This aligns to another of my real passions, sustainability – not just at Vapour, but also within the industry as a whole and among our clients, by supporting their digital transformation with sustainable decisions.  Our ESG strategy and execution is paramount.

6. How can the channel drive greater diversity in the sector?

We need diversity in the sector from the floor level to the boardroom, to ensure there are a diverse range of views – this is particularly the case in tech, where innovation plays such a vital role.  Having this as a value and behaviour within the business, shows the support that comes from board level, and the role everyone can play.  By opening up discussions at department meetings, and even having a committee in place to be involved in driving change where needed, it is important to think outside the box to accommodate everyone, and continue to push for diversity and consider all needs.

7. How can the channel look to attract more females into leadership positions in the channel?

There is evidence to show that having females in leadership and board positions can improve performance and attract more female talent into businesses, particularly in roles that would previously have been deemed male-orientated such as engineering. 

Having policies such as split maternity/paternity leave, advertising job salaries to be transparent and ensuring female mentoring programmes are in place, all helps, as well as supporting on leadership and training programmes, and reviewing how job adverts are written (in less masculine language). Our male colleagues can be allies in this too – it is not just a female subject to drive and champion.

From landing client contracts and speaking at industry events, to securing recognition for our impact and embarking on fundraising endeavours, it’s been an exciting time for Vapour. And as we prepare to launch into our tenth year of growth, we’re yet to see our trajectory stall.

That’s why we’re seeking a new sales and marketing administrator to welcome into the fold immediately. This will be a critical role at the heart of a busy and growing sales team, with an opportunity to also work closely with our CEO and head of communications.

The world is your oyster too. Vapour is passionate about nurturing and retaining talent with tailored career development plans. This role could therefore evolve with progression opportunities in the sales/marketing teams or office management, in the future.

Right now, the priority is the appointment of a committed, outgoing and diligent self-starter, who is extremely organised, has a ‘can do’ attitude, and is looking to grow in a company that cares about its people, customers, charity (Borne), and the environment.

Discover more specifics of the role on offer…

Job title: Sales and Marketing Administrator

Location: Heritage Exchange, Huddersfield

Our vibrant office is located in the heart of a restored textiles mill in Lindley, 5 minutes from the M62 and less than 10 minutes from Huddersfield train station. The bustling location has an on-site deli cafe, gym (with discounted membership for employees), spa, free parking, hair salon, and more.

Hours: Monday to Friday, 9am-5:30pm

This is a full-time position, but flexible working is offered as standard.

Responsibilities include:

Holidays: 20 days per calendar year, plus birthday holiday

Holidays increase 1 day per year following 1 year of service at the start of each holiday calendar – up to a maximum of 5 days.

Additional benefits include:

About the company: Vapour was founded in November 2013, coming to the market with a cloud-first mission that sought to disrupt, innovate, and demystify the world of tech. Since then, we’ve helped organisations of all shapes and sizes unlock significant growth with high-performance strategic technology.

While technology is exciting, innovations starts with people. That’s why we’re known just as much for our team as we are our toolkit, and why each new hire plays an integral role in helping shape our future.

Relevant experience is desirable for this role, but not essential, as full training will be provided to the successful candidate.

So, whether you’re starting out on a new career path, or have a rich history in the sales and marketing industry, we look forward to hearing from you.

Apply now, by sending your CV to: careers@vapourcloud.com   

It’s Graeme’s turn in the spotlight this month. Today he shares that his love for tech stemmed from working on nuclear submarines, expresses his admiration of Apple and debunks the misconception that tech needs to be complicated…

How did you first get into the world of tech?

I think I’ve always had an interest in tech. From calibrating reactor instrumentation onboard nuclear submarines in the Royal Navy to piloting remote vehicles on the seabed while offshore, which then led me to enter the telecoms world for the last nine years. 

And what is your earliest memory of tech in your life?

I’m going to show my age here…. I’d say probably a BBC micro when I was at junior school – for those who don’t know, enjoy googling that! I also remember a ZX Spectrum playing Daley Thompsons Decathlon.

What’s the one quality you need to thrive in this environment (especially at Vapour)?

I don’t believe there is one specific quality needed. I think you need to have many attributes to your persona and then be able to bring them together to get a full understanding of each customer requirement.

And what is the one thing you would change about the tech sector?

Too many acronyms…the fact that suppliers and manufacturers produce a similar product but then decide to overcomplicate things by using new acronyms for services and products that already exist.

Why do you think Vapour stands out in the channel?

Before joining Vapour, I spoke to various contacts I have within the industry, and all had positive things to say about the company. From my time here so far, I can see that the company’s biggest assets are the staff and how we pull together to give the customer the best experience we can.

Complete the sentences:

The next purchase on my (personal) tech wishlist is... a Garmin Vivoactive watch – which I’ve just bought myself to monitor my fitness training. 

A tech firm that has really stood out for me in the last 12 months is... Apple. I know this is going to divide the room, but the company is big for me at the minute. 

The biggest misconception in the channel is that... tech needs to be overly complicated.

By the end of 2022, our tech will have made organisations far more... collaborative - giving users an increased ability to work in multiple locations.

It’s no secret that the global tech sector is advancing at an astonishingly rapid pace – not least in relation to the now integral role of digital transformation in spearheading growth and success. But no matter the size or scope or your organisation – or how sophisticated your innovation strategy is – the only way to drive significant change is to leverage the power of people.

So, to champion some of the industry’ finest talent, and gain some insight into the minds of individuals from across the tech space, we’re inviting friends and partners of the business to take part in our quickfire Q&A.

Up next, it’s Craig Webster – contracts manager at award-winning IT service provider, Mint Support. Take it away, Craig…

Tell us about your role at Mint Support and the part you play in the tech sector.

As contracts manager, I’m responsible for maintaining and developing relationships with our new and existing customers – I’m always on the lookout for improvements in both service and delivery. Mint provides managed support services, primarily for the education sector, but also for businesses too.

What innovation was the turning point for your organisation, to get it to where you are now?

IT is continually developing, so keeping abreast of developments and being able to support customers through these changes is key. You could say that the PC and internet were the innovations that allowed us to ‘exist’, and their continuous developments mean we are always working alongside new technology.

And where’s next for your business?

We’re migrating into communication technology and making the most of remote tools to deliver services to customers further afield.

The biggest misconception faced by the tech sector is…

That technology will solve everything.

What do you think will be the biggest tech trend over the next 12 months?

Further development in AI and automation – that is definitely a trend I expect to see grow. I also think that we will see much more focus on sustainability and greener solutions within the tech space over the coming months.

What top tip would you give to an individual trying to excel their tech career?

Remember that technology is there to make life better for the end user. At the end of the day, you’re dealing with people.

The next purchase on my personal tech wishlist is…?

I’d love a drone – using that technology to capture creative video and photography appeals to me.

What is one longstanding piece of tech that you are shocked is still used today?

The vinyl record – but I’m glad it still exists.

If you are without the internet for an hour, what would be the first activity you resort to, to pass the time?

I’m a simple guy who remembers a time before the internet, so I can think of plenty of things. For me, I enjoy getting out of the house for a long walk and spending time with my family and friends. I think that sometimes, even if the internet is working fine, we should switch off, as it is easy to get distracted.

Vapour boss Tim Mercer has signed up for his toughest fundraiser yet, all in aid of the premature birth charity, Borne.

On 19 May, our CEO will don his boxing gloves and step into the ring for the CRN Fight Night, at The Brewery in London.

A sell out industry event that has raised £220,000 for charity since the contests began in 2008, this is Tim’s first time up against an opponent.

Aware the selection process is notoriously tough, he applied to fight at the start of 2022, before being invited for a nerve-racking assessment. He was one of only 16 UK tech professionals selected, and all eyes are now on the black-tie event to see if Tim ‘No Mercy’ Mercer can bring home the title.

Fighting for the blue team, he will face Paul O’Sullivan, UK sales director at Threatscape, in the red corner.

Travelling to the Ring Boxing Club in Southwark, South London, every week for training, Tim had already upped his fitness regime last year, in preparation for his ‘week of hell’. That particular challenge - which saw him row, cycle, run and climb 286km - was one of his first major fundraisers for Borne back in October.

Since then, he and the Vapour team have raised £8,500 for the charity - and counting - with hopes that Fight Night will get them to £15,000. The ultimate goal is to reach £23,000 before the year is out.

Commenting on his latest challenge, Tim said: “I’m a big boxing fan, so when I saw the application process open for Fight Night, I thought - why not?!

“But when the news dropped that I’d made the lineup, s**t got real!

“There’s a difference between sparring and going toe to toe with an opponent - as I’ve already learned. But I’m tackling this event just as I would anything else - properly! I’m training hard, eating really well, and improving my technique week by week. I’ve got a table of supporters coming to cheer me on but I hope people will get behind me from a distance too, and dig deep for Borne.”

Over 15 million babies are born too soon every year, and 1 million of those die. Borne is a charity dedicated to saving lives, preventing disability, and creating lifelong health for mothers and babies. Anyone wishing to sponsor Tim can donate via Vapour’s JustGiving page.

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